Video Tutorials

Whether you're configuring, troubleshooting, or researching our power controllers, these step-by-step web videos offer a visual alternative to written manuals. Check back here or subscribe to our Youtube channel to see more web tutorials as we release them.

Video Categories

MicroFUSION + Connect Module

FUSION Digital Controllers

Control Panel Software

Digital Interface Options

Short Circuit Current Rating (SCCR)

4/8/15 Webinar: MicroFUSION + Connect Module

Control Panel Firmware 5.0 Features

The FUSION Control Panel is provided free with all our micorprocessor-based controllers. This software allows you to conveniently monitor and adjust your controller settings.

In 2014, we are releasing our controllers with Control Panel 3.5, which is required to run Version 5.0 firmware.
Firmware 5.0 adds new features and made the control panel even more customizable. These include: 1) Custom display, 2) Zero Cross Trasnformer Mode, 3) User Lock, 4) Three Phase Load Imbalance, 5) monitor parameters, and the ability to name IP addresses

In this video, we will cover a few of these features, found under display control, and user settings.

First, connect to a powered controller via USB. Open the Control Panel and click "Connect" on the left side of the screen. Then click on the system tab, and on the right side of the screen you will find the Display Control Options and User Settings.

The display control options dictate what information will be available on your controller's digital display.

Clicking on "Default Screen List" returns the Control Panel to manufacturing defaults.

Selecting Custom Screen List opens a new window. From here you can choose what relevant data appears on your controller display, or create custom text.

The controller can display a maximum of 50 screens. Each screen contains up to two lines of text. The Screen List tells us which parameters are currently being displayed.

To add or remove screens, select a parameter from the Display List and select "Add," "Remove," or "Replace." For example, say I want "Control Loop Response" for Zone 1. I would like it to display above Feedback Zone 1, so I select that parameter and click "Add."

This third window tells us how the parameter will appear on the controller display: as "Slew Rate Z1." When we click "Program," these changes will be applied.

Custom text may be useful for naming a controller or giving instructions specific to your task. Enter the text you wish to display in the Custom Text fields, (maximum of 16 characters per line) highlight "Custom Text" from the end of the Display list and choose "Add" or "Replace."

Under "Analog Input Monitor Params" are options to specify titles and units for Monitor parameters. We will cover how to use analog inputs for general purpose in another tutorial.

Again, to approve changes, select "Program" and close the Custom Screen List dialog box. You must then reset the controller for the changes to take effect.

Many parameters can be edited from the controller display. Parameter lock prevents users from changing specific parameters unless they enter the right password. By default, this password is "4000."

From the parameter lock menu, select the parameters you wish to lock, enter your password, and click "Program" to make the change.  You may also choose to use the Lock All or Unlock all buttons.
Once the initial password is entered, you may also change the password by selecting the Change Password checkbox and entering a new 4-number combination into the field. 

An editable parameter will appear on the controller display with a dot preceding the text. Pressing the green checkmark key will allow you to edit the parameter value. When the parameter is locked, an asterik (*) appears instead, and the green checkmark key will prompt you to enter the password.

Use the arrow keys to enter the correct combination, pressing the green key to move forward to the next number. If the correct password is entered, parameters are unlocked and can be locked again by pressing and holding the plus sign (+) key.

Let's return to the Display Control options. If the "Auto-Scroll Enabled" checkbox is selected, the controller display will cycle through the approved parameters. Auto-scroll also resumes after ten minutes of inactivity, and can be turned on via the controller display panel by pressing and holding the Up Arrow key.

Moving on to User settings. These options are available in Firmware version 5.00 and later releases. Click Save to Backup after making changes to save your settings to your computer.

Restore From Backup allows you to restore previously-saved custom settings.

For more information, you can visit our website at www.ccipower.com, or contact the experts directly at Control Concepts, Inc.

Sync-Guard Feature Overview

 

Transcript

When multiple zero cross controllers are connected to the same power source, the result can be a high peak current; the controllers switch from on to off at the same time, requiring very high current and then no current.

This can result in:

  • Fluctuations in power, causing flickering lights and potential damage to electronics
  • Increased risk of a blown fuse or overloaded transformer.
  • Higher utility costs

To address these problems, we developed SYNC-GUARD, a trademarked technology that reduces peak current requirement by causing multiple controllers to fire in turn.

Here we have a scope reading of two zero-cross controllers connected to one power source and operating without SYNC-GUARD. Once we enable SYNC-GUARD, the peak current falls and the current demand is more consistently at 50% duty cycle.

We've connected the two controllers to light bulbs to demonstrate how each fires in turn: one is firing while while the other is off.

SYNC-GUARD was designed to be used with a maximum of ten controllers.

This scope shows Sync-Guard's impact with all ten controllers running. This top line marks the current demand if all ten controllers are firing at once, the middle line is 50 %, and the bottom line if none are firing.

Even with SYNC-GUARD enabled, occasionally multiple controllers will still fire at the same time. The probability of this happening is highest when many controllers transition into the RUN state and turn on at the same time. SYNC-GUARD may not eliminate this occurance altogether, but overall it ensures a much more consistent current draw.

For more information, you can visit our website at www.ccipower.com, or contact the experts directly at Control Concepts, Inc.

SCCR Testing Procedures

Transcript:

Our FUSION SCR power controllers have a 100kA Short Circuit Current Rating (SCCR). Here's a behind-the-scenes look at our testing procedures.

The tests were conducted at Bussman Labs, in St. Louis, MO.

The controllers passed two tests: Standard Fault, and High Fault.

For the standard fault test, fuses are calibrated to have a let-through current of the peak let-through for the recommended fuse size. The high fault test uses the recommended fuse size: fast-acting, Class T fuses.

Here is the load and shorting contactor. The metal enclosure is to be connected to the phase of the source of supply which is connected to the pole judged as having the least risk of arcing to ground.

The controller is held in a wire mesh cage sized to 150% of controller size. This simulates the minimum requirement panel size for an end user. This cage is covered in cotton mesh that is considered highly flammable. Everything is installed according to manufacturer's recommendations.

To run the test, we initiate voltage to the controller and charge up the generator to a specific level determined by the fuse size. After counting down, the short is triggered by the contactor.

The contactor, located here, is sized to allow the peak let-through current of the fuses. A smaller contacter would not provide enough let-through and would void the test.

The noise heard is the contactor closing. The flash is the arc flash of the contactor when the short is being initiated.

In order to pass the tests, controller buswork, and ground wire must remain intact. The ground wire does not open or break, and nothing in or around the controller can have burn marks showing signs of a flame.

All FUSION and Compact FUSION units have received a 100kA short circuit current rating after passing these tests.
Contact Information onscreen

For more information about the rating and how SCCR impacts your business, visit www.ccipower.com/SCCR, or contact the experts directly and call Control Concepts, Inc.

What Is Short Circuit Current Rating?

Transcript:

Hi, I'm Dan Bender, and I'm the Director of Sales for Control Concepts, Inc. Today I want to talk about Short Circuit Current, and Short Circuit Current Rating. 

First, what is Short Circuit Current? Well, it's the available fault current in the supply lines that are feeding branch circuits that have power conversion equipment, such as SCR power controllers and other devices. 

Short Circuit Current Rating is the manufacturer's description on their nameplate of the maximum fault current the equipment can withstand, when properly installed with the appropriate overcurrent protection devices. 

How does this impact companies? Many companies will have a governing body that will establish a Short Circuit Current Rating. Typically, this is 65kA or greater. The intent of this is for personnel protection, lowering insurance rates, and meeting specific codes such as NFPA 70E and UL 508A Supplement SB. 

This is becoming more and more common, and unfortunately all too often, people are finding out about it at time of installation. The time to be discussing this is during the design criteria. 

You must be aware that the "weakest link" is the situation we have to be concerned with. For example, if a piece of equipment has a 65kA rating, and another device has a 5kA rating, the entire circuit is based on the weakest link – in this case, 5kA. 

It's all about safety. What we have here is your potential for a fault current that can cause an arc flash, and that means that individuals who are responsible for working on this equipment now have to wear protective clothing. This protective clothing is expensive, and it is cumbersome. Furthermore, if there is arc flash, there is potential for someone to be seriously hurt, or something even more catastrophic.

Just adding branch-rated fuses may or may not meet this criteria. That's where Control Concepts can help you out. Our equipment has a 100kA Short Circuit Current Rating. You can go to our website and find out more information about that. In fact, you can watch a video of the actual Short Circuit Current testing

There has been some confusion about SCCR and Interrupt Capacity. These are two totally different things. You can go to our website and find more information about how these are different.

In wrapping up, the purpose of this is to give you some information about Short Circuit Current Rating and how you can find information to help you design a system that is safe for your personnel. Thank you.

Improve Power Factor with Zero Cross Transformer Mode

Transcript:

Welcome. I'm Cory Watkins, President of Control Concepts. Today we're here to discuss how you can improve power factor for transformer-coupled loads.

Now, traditionally, zero cross SCR controllers are used for resistive loads. This is because zero cross operation reduces harmonics and maintains existing power factor. However, if a system design requires an isolation or step-down transformer, you would need to switch to phase angle operation in order to prevent saturation of the transformer. Switching to phase angle operation has the advantage of improved power control, but suffers from both increased harmonics and degraded power factor.

Today, with the advent of digital SCR technology, we are able to combine phase angle and zero cross firing technlogies into a hybrid firing mode that we proudly introduce as "Zero Cross Transformer Mode," or ZCT Mode. 

This technology allows you to maintain a power factor of greater than 0.9 from 50-100% command signal, thereby eliminating the penalties you may see from your utilities.

So you may be wondering, are you a good candidate for ZCT Mode? Good candidates are those who are:

  • Looking for improved power factor
  • Have transformer-coupled loads
  • Either require high thermal inertia, or require less stringent process control

So in summary, Zero Cross Transformer Mode can improve power factor by maintaining a power factor of 0.9 or greater from 50-100% command signal for transformer-coupled loads. 

If you'd like to learn more or talk to one of our application engineers about your project, give us a call at Control Concepts. Thank you.

Mounting the Remote Display

Transcript:

Welcome. This video will demonstrate how to remove the digital display from your FUSION controller, and mount it on an electrical enclosure.

A removable display is included with our digital power controllers, and a remote display kit is available as an option. This allows you to conveniently read and adjust parameters from outside the electrical enclosure, without any amp meters, switches, or additional wiring. When properly installed, the remote display has an IP65 rating.

To remove your controller display, remove the four screws from your controller front cover, and take off the lid.

Then disconnect the display cable found here.

Remove the display using these four tabs. Now let's turn to the contents of the remote mounting kit.

The kit includes the following:

  • One back display cover
  • One square gasket
  • One 5- or 25-food shielded display cable
  • A blank display panel
  • A small ferrite
  • Four mounting screws

You will also need the display panel from the controller.

While you're using the remote display, you can insert the blank display panel into the controller lid and reattach it.

Unclasp the ferrite with a screwdriver and attach it to the display cable as shown.

Also, place the gasket on the back of the display. 

You will need to cut a quarter-din knockout in the electrical panel. Insert the display into the panel and plug in the display cable. The ferrite will fit inside the back display cover which fits over the top. 

Use the four mounting screws to secure and tighten the panel. Be sure to use equal pressure and tighten slowly until the gasket is compressed 50% on all sides. You must be careful not to over-tighten; here we've attached a second gasket to the panel for comparison.

Now connect the display cable to the remote display connector on the side of the controller and connect power. You can now use the remote display to monitor and operate the controller from outside the enclosure.

For more information, visit our website at www.ccipower.com or contact the experts directly at Control Concepts. 

Replacing a Fuse

Transcript:

Welcome. In this video, we will go over fuse replacement for a Compact FUSION SCR Power Controller.

You will need the following:

  • A #2 Philips bit screwdriver
  • A small flat head screwdriver
  • If you are working with a 10 - 50A controller, you will also need a pair of fuse-pulling pliers.
  • A 80 - 160A controller will call for a #3 philips bit and a torque wrench.
  • You will also need some electrically-conductive anti-corrosive paste, like Penatrox A, and the replacement fuse or fuses - these are available for purchase from Control Concepts

Before replacing a fuse, you must turn off line power and control power. Then use a screwdriver to remove the controller lid. Disconnect the display wire and set the lid aside.

Now, remove the main wire harness by pulling very gently on the connectors - not the wire itself. 

You will also need to remove the flat flex cable as shown. Pull the key toward the cable from both edges of the connector. The key tabs will stay attached to the connector.

Remove the four screws in the corners of the gate driver board. Gently lift the board out of the controller.

Now the steps vary depending on your controller size. A 10-50A Compact FUSION is pretty straightforward: simply remove and replace the fuse. We will focus more on the 80 - 160A sizes.

These controllers have fuses attached to insulators. Here is a 160A controller - we remove the screws, paying attention to how the bus bars, wires, and lugs are oriented.

An 80A controller also has a DVDT board that must be removed from the SCR to get to the bus bar.

Once you've removed the bad fuse, take the new fuse and apply a thin layer of conductive anti-corrosive paste where it contacts the lug and the bus bar.

Insert the fuse, reattach the red wire with the ring terminal, and the lug. Torque the screws holding the fuse to 75 in-lbs.

For an 80A controller, you will do the same: torque the screws around the fuse to 75 in-lbs, and then re-attach the DVDT board and torque the stand offs to 25 in-lbs.

Now we continue working backward: Connect the leads from the current transformer. Re-insert the gate board with the 4 screws, and keep the board supported and not over-stressed while you connect the installation displacement connectors. Next, connect the flat flex cables, starting with the shortest. Be sure that you insert these cables into the key evenly - they should not be crooked or below the key altogether.Re-connect all the wiring to the correct headers, as well as any fan wires if present. (say 2x, once without) Reconnect the display cable. Re-attach the controller lids. Finally, apply control and line power and make sure a blown fuse indicator is NOT present.

For more information or assistance, download the Compact FUSION Installation manual from our website at www.ccipower.com or contact the experts directly by calling Control Concepts, Inc.

Advanced Setup Part 2

Transcript:

Welcome. This video will cover the advanced settings found in the Zone Tabs in the FUSION Control Panel.

First, of course, you will need to install the Control Panel software, provided free with your controller. Then connect to your powered controller with a USB cable and open the program. Click the Connect Button, and then the Zone 1 tab. You will have multiple zone tabs if you have multiple zones on the controller, and they all have an identical layout.

First, you can select your feedback type from this drop-down menu. RMS Voltage is selected by default.

Your Firing Mode will depend on your hardware. For a transformer-coupled or highly-inductive load, or loads with a precision temperature control requirement, we generally recommend Phase Angle. Otherwise we recommend Zero Cross. The advanced modes, zero cross burst and zero cross phase angle start, are used in situations that call for extreme power efficiency. Consult Control Concepts for more information about advanced modes.

For your Control Mode, you can choose either Closed Loop or Open Loop. With Closed Loop, the processor uses feedback and automatically adjusts SCR turn-on time to achieve the desired setpoint. This mode is usually preferable because it maintains an accurate setpoint, while Open Loop is typically only used for diagnostic purposes. For more information, refer to the Control Panel manual or contact Control Concepts.

Your ramp time limits how fast the controller turns on. Entering 10, for example, tells the controller to take ten seconds to ramp up to your target setpoint. Zero means this feature is disabled.

Control Response Factor is a tuning parameter that controls how aggressively or slowly the controller will respond to feedback. 500 is the default, and you reduce the number to make the controller respond more aggressively, and increase the number to make it respond more slowly. Note that these are not time units, the number simply determines how the controller responds, with 500 as a starting point.

The Deviation Band setting generates an alarm if the controller feedback is a certain percentage over or under the desired setpoint. This setting is not available on all firmware - again, contact CCI if you have questions about your firmware release.

We've covered both Full Scale settings and Limits before, in our Basic Setup tutorial, so let's move on to Zero Cross settings.

Burst Start Angle specifically applies to the burst start firing mode. It is a tuning parameter used for firing into transformers. By default it is set to 90 degrees, and you can adjust the angle to prevent saturation, depending on your system design and downstream transformer characteristics. The acceptable range is 15 to 150.

This next setting is for the Zero Cross - Phase Angle Start firing mode. It determines how many phase angle cycles will set up a magnetic field in a transformer. The default setting is 12. A lower number means an improved power factor, so test with your load to select the best setting.

Finally, let's look at our relay alarms. Check the box next to an alarm to direct it to a relay. By default, Relay 1 is set to Current Trip and Over-Temp, and Relay 2 is set to Shorted SCR and Warning Temp. Note that while you can check as many alarms as you want, if more than one are checked per relay, you won't be able to determine which alarm caused the fault except by using the keypad display or accessing the information with digital communications.

For more information, check out our other video tutorials, download the Control Panel manual from our website at www.ccipower.com, or contact the experts directly at Control Concepts Inc.

Advanced Setup Part 1

Transcript:

Welcome. This video series will provide an overview of advanced settings on your FUSION and Compact FUSION controller. We will start with the System tab and cover the Zone tabs in a second video.

Before we begin, you will need to install the Control Panel software, which is provided free with your controller. Then connect to your powered controller with a USB cable.

Open the Control Panel and click the Connect button. Now we'll go over the different advanced options under the System tab.

The run logic option controls polarity of pin 7 and 9. By default, the logic is set to closed for run. Toggling this option is the equivalent of opening and closing the run/reset.

This next option is specifically for 3-phase controllers with 4-wire wye or inside delta loads. Otherwise it will not appear on your Control Panel. This option is specified at order time as it requires a specific internal wire harness. Contact Control Concepts if you would like this option.

When Hero Mode is enabled, the controller will continue running in the event of an over-temp condition. By default, this feature is disabled, but you may enable it with SP-84 or with this field on the control panel. You will receive a warning that doing so will void controller warranty. Click OK if you wish to continue.

Now, from the Zone tabs, you can set different relay alarms. We'll go over this in detail in our next video. With regards to Hero Mode, just know that if a relay mask has "Heatsink Over Temp" selected, the relay will energize. Inhibit alarms will still indicate the over-temp condition. But your controller will stay in a run state, and the display and the indicator LEDs will register a warning alarm instead of an inhibit alarm.

Hero Mode is not available on all firmware versions. Contact Control Concepts with questions about this feature and new firmware releases.

If you are using Sync Guard, you may enable the sync guard resistor to do load balancing across multiple zero-cross controllers. Typically, customers with networks of controllers have this setting enabled on the master and disabled on the others.

We've covered analog setpoints in an earlier video. Let's move on to these relay alarms. These are processor or system level alarms, and you can map to either relay one or relay two.

For example, if we mark the checkbox for "PLL Lock Loss," an alarm is output to relay 1 if the controller is unable to synchronize with the mains line frequency.

"In Run State" indicates the controller is in a true run state as opposed to a Stop or Fault state. And "Run Enable" is a pass through for pin 9 - it mirrors its input. So if pin 9 is open, the relay is open, and vice versa.

Here in the corner, you'll find our contact information and a link to the Control Concepts website. And this icon opens WebEx, which is the tool we use for troubleshooting a controller online with a laptop connected to a controller in the field.

For more information, check out our other video tutorials, download the Control Panel manual from our website at www.ccipower.com, or contact the experts directly at Control Concepts Inc.

Basic Setup Part 2

Transcript

Next we'll view and configure our full scale settings. There are two ways to do so: using the controller display, or the FUSION Control Panel software. First let's go over the default settings; it will be easier to view them using the Control Panel, and then we will make changes using both methods.

To access the control panel, you must first install the software provided free with your controller. Then, connect to the controller using a USB cable and open the program. Click the "Connect" button on the lefthand side of the screen.

Select the "Zone 1" tab. You will find your Feedback type listed here; by default it will be set to RMS Voltage. You can choose another Feedback type using this drop-down list.

Next, we will look at full scale settings. The default line voltage will be 480 volts, which is what the controller is at. Fullscale current will depend on the frame current size of your controller. And we can automatically calculate power and limits by clicking this button.

Limits are calculated based on your fullscale settings. Voltage limit, by default, is set to 630 volts, the limit of the controller. Current limit is 1.05 times fullscale current. And current trip will be 1.75 times full scale current in phase angle mode, and 4 times full scale current in zero cross mode. Power limit is 1.05 times full scale power.

You can change these settings using their respective fields on the control panel. So for example, let's say we're using 415 V for our line voltage, and we have a silicon carbide load, which is a variable resistance load. In that case, current will fluctuate based on temperature and aging, and we will want to maintain steady power, so let's use power as our feedback type.

When we change our full scale settings, our first question should be, "What is the nominal line voltage?" In this case, we have 415 volts, so we'll enter that for our full scale voltage.

Next we want to consider what is full load amps when we're at lowest voltage - at 5 or 10 % voltage sag. We'll enter 60 amps. Next we click this button to calculate power and limits.

Once you've entered new values, click the "reset button" to be sure everything is applied, and then click "Connect." Afterward you will want to save a Config File so you can return to these settings.

To change these settings using the controller display, use the up/down arrow keys to scroll until you find the settings you're looking for. If there is a dot next to the setting, you can edit the value; press the green check mark button and it will change to a small arrow. Then use the plus/minus buttons until you reach the desired setting or value. Press the green button again to save the change.

So again, we choose power as our feedback type; 415 V - our nominal line voltage - for full scale voltage; and 60 Amps for full scale current. Using the formulas we covered earlier, calculate power and limits and enter them respectively.

Basic Setup Part 1

Transcript

Welcome. This video will walk through the basic set up of a FUSION or Compact FUSION SCR power controller. We will do so in four parts: first, mounting, wiring, and basic controller operation. And a second video will cover Full scale settings.

First, you will need to mount the controller. Be sure to do so at least 3 inches away from other devices in order to ensure proper ventilation. Next, ground the controller as shown.

Then we need to connect line power,  load connections, and control power. For single phase and three phase 2 leg controllers, you will also need to connect a reference voltage to the line ref input shown here.

On the side of the controller, locate the P1 connector, found here. Note that pin 7 and pin 9 are the run and reset - used to enable, disable, or reset the controller. These pins are commonly wired with a run/stop switch.

Please note that while opening the run/stop on pin7 and pin9 inhibits firing of the SCRs within one half-cycle, the only safe way to service the controller is by having the mains disconnected by mechanical means. SCRs are solid state devices and cannot be considered a mechanically safe disconnect.

You will see voltage on the load side of SCRS even when not firing

We will wire pin7 and pin9 closed to enable controller operation in the following examples.

Next we'll cover analog setpoints.

You can use the built-in display on the controller to monitor and change your controller settings. Scroll through the settings using the arrow keys to “Setpoint Type.” The display tells us that we are currently using analog control – this is the default setting, and means that Pin 7 and Pin 8 on P1 are open.

Use the arrow keys to view Setpoint Selection - we are using setpoint 1. On P1, this means that Pin 7 and Pin 10 are open. Then we can scroll down further on the display and see that Setpoint 1 is currently reading a 16.78 mA  analog command signal shown here connected to pins 2 & 3.

To switch to analog setpoint 2, simply close Pin 7 and 10 and move your analog command signal to pins 4 & 5.

Now let's go back and wire the controller for Digital Setpoint 1. To do so, close Pin 7 and Pin 8 to select the Digital Setpoint and make sure Pin 10 is left open to select setpoint 1. Then scroll to Digital Setpoint 1 on the display to see the digital setpoint command. We will come back and edit this setting in a minute.

First we'll go over basic controller operation. We've already mounted, grounded, and wired the controller. Let's take a closer look at our indicator LEDs.

The top LED will turn green after you've connected Universal Input power - this is what powers the controller's electronics. The second LED will turn green when the mains input power is present. The Status LED has three settings: green for a run state, orange for a warning alarm, and red for an inhibit alarm. If the Status LED is off completely, no alarms are present but the controller is not enabled

We've wire the controller for analog control, and we'll use an analog source to change our settings; in our case we've connected to our controller with a PLC.

From the display we can confirm that we're using analog control and setpoint 1. We can also scroll down using the arrow keys to view the output of both setpoints, and use our PLC to increase or decrease output between 4 - 20 mA.

Let's go back and try this using a Digital setpoint. To do so, Pin 7 and Pin 8 must be closed. Then we scroll on the display to Digital Setpoint. The dot next to the name indicates that we can edit the setting, so we press the green button and use the plus or minus keys to change the output from 0 to 100 percent. Once we reach the right value, we press the green button again and save the change - we are now operating with 85 % power.

For more information, visit our website at www.ccipower.com, or contact the experts at Control Concepts Incorporated.

Firmware Upgrade

Transcript:

Welcome. In this video we will cover firmware upgrades for FUSION and Compact FUSION SCR power controllers.

Control Concepts releases firmware upgrades either to enhance features on the controller, or to correct firmware errors. If there is a critical firmware flaw, we will make our best efforts to contact our original customers so they can update the firmware on their controller.

Customers may also contact Control Concepts to suggest firmware enhancements. These suggestions are reviewed and prioritized by the factory, and not all suggestions can be implemented.  Furthermore, some enhancements will only be available on new controllers, although we make our best efforts to make firmware backward- compatible, .

Only upgrade firmware on a controller when directed by Control Concepts.  Ignoring this warning may leave your controller in an unusable state. If the factory directs you to upgrade firmware, we will send you a link to download the correct .hex file. You can then access and upload the file using the FUSION Control Panel software provided free with your controller.

To download a new firmware file, first connect to your powered controller with a USB cable and open the Control Panel program. Click the "connect" button on the lefthand side of your scren.

Take note of your Software ID and Version number: in this case the software ID is 22, we're using Firmware Version 3.61, and we need to upgrade to Version 3.70.

First, save a config file to ensure that you can return to your previous settings. Then click the firmware button. Navigate to the hex file provided by the factory and confirm that the number matches your Software ID and the new firmware version number -  in our case 22 and 3.70. You will not be able to select a file with a Software ID that doesn't match. If you receive an error message like this one, contact the factory for a compatible firmware file.

Once you've selected the right file, click "open" and a green bar will appear here, indicating that the file is loading. The Controller Display will also change to this screen.

It is extremely important that you do not disconnect power from your computer or controller at this step. The progress bar may not reflect the realtime progress of the firmware upgrade, so don't be concerned or disconnect power in an attempt to restart. Simply wait for the display to change to this screen, indicating the firmware upgrade is complete.

If there is a problem with the upgrade, the controller will automatically recover itself, but if power is disconnected, the controller will reboot to a blank screen. In this event, contact the factory for assistance.

After a firmware upgrade, verify your controller settings have persisted, as settings may have changed during the upgrade.  If so, re-load your settings from the previously saved config file.

For more information, visit our website at www.ccipower.com, or contact the experts at Control Concepts Incorporated.

Auxiliary I/O Retransmit Scaling

Transcript:

Welcome. This video will demonstrate auxiliary I/O retransmit scaling.

Before we begin, we will need to install the Control Panel software, which is provided free with your controller. Connect power to the controller and connect to your computer with a USB cable. 

First, connect to the controller using the USB interface.

The auxiliary I/O card is an optional component on our FUSION and Compact FUSION controllers. The card is located on the controller here. If your controller has an auxiliary I/O card, relevant options will be available to you on the control panel software.

You will see a -1000 in its model number, and this tab, the Aux I/O tab, will be part of your control panel.

The card has 2 digital inputs, digital 2 outputs, and 2 analog retransmits. You can see their statuses here on the control panel screen.

When we click on the Aux I/O tab, we can see Meter 1 and Meter 2 at the bottom of the screen. By default, both are set to 0 - 5 V DC. The Meter 1 Signal is set to RMS Load Voltage A, and the signal for Meter 2 is set to RMS Load Current A.

Let's do a couple of scenarios with retransmit scaling.

SCENARIO 1: Output = power 4-20 mA = 0 - 100%

You can choose up to two signals from the drop-down menus to retransmit. For our demonstration, let's change our output type to current, have Meter 1 output Power, and use 4-20 mA as 0 - 100 percent of full scale power.

We can check the Zone 1 tab for information about our fullscale settings. Here we see that fullscale power is equal to 9.6 killowatts.

Let's look at one more scenario. You may want to use a Direct Out test for trouble shooting or system start up. We change meter 2's signal to direct out. Let's also change the output type on meter 2 to 4 - 20 mA current.

Now we can enter a mA value in the Meter 2 Direct Out field, and the controller will output at that value.

Config Files: Saving, Loading, and Duplicating Settings

Transcript:

Welcome. In this video, we will use config files to save, load, and duplicate our controller settings. We will also cover how to restore manufacturing defaults.
A config file is a copy of all your paramaters and calibration data - it is a fingerprint for your controller.

Config files are useful in many situations. You may want to save settings that you will use on a regular basis. Or perhaps you want to run a test using different parameters, and want the option of reverting to the original settings afterward.

You can also use a config file like a template to recreate settings on multiple systems.

Before we get started, open the control panel and make sure USB is selected as your interface. Then hit connect.

Now we can save a config file of our settings. This is a pretty straightforward process: Let's say you've made some changes and you're at point where you would like to save your settings, click "save config file." An .xml file is created, named FUSION and then your serial number. Obviously you can change the name and location to whatever you want, we'll just leave it as it is.

Ok, now we want to load the config file we saved earlier, and bring back our old settings . We select the Load Config File button and choose it here. And then we're back to our settings from before.

A config file only loads setup parameters, the parameters that you are able to change. If you have multiple controllers with identical hardware parameters, you can load the same config file to all of them, like a template.

So for example, here I've created a master config file, and I can load it to keep multiple controllers running with the same settings.

You could also restore factory settings. That option is located here, and will return the controller to its original parameters and settings. Your controller will be returned to a known state, but just remember that any changes that you've made will be lost.

For more detailed instructions, visit our website at www.ccipower.com or contact the experts at Control Concepts, Inc.

Modbus TCP Setup

Welcome. This video will demonstrate setup and basic procedures for communicating with your FUSION Controller using the Modbus TCP Fieldbus over an Ethernet connection.

Modbus TCP is a fieldbus that allows digital communication between a PLC and the controller.

There are some advantages to using Modbus TCP over an analog interface: first, it allows access to all user parameters. It eliminates analog error, and lowers wiring installation costs.

Before we begin, you'll need to install the Control Panel software, provided free with your controller.

Connect power to the controller and connect to your computer with a USB cable.

Now, you will need to set up communication between your factory controller or PLC and the power controller. For this tutorial, we will use a laptop connected to the controller with an Ethernet cable.

Let's look at a few basic procedures. First, we will identify the IP address on our controller.

From the outside of the controller, you can use the up and down arrows to scroll through parameters and find the IP address. Your controller may display zeroes if it is using default factory settings.

Let's also open the Control Panel software. On the lefthand side of the screen, you should see USB selected as the interface. Click the "Connect" button.

Next choose the "Digital Communication" tab. You will see "Common Settings" - we'll come back to that later - and below that: TCP/IP Settings. Here we can view or change the IP address.

Now let's set our network IP address on the controller. First we enter the address here. You will need to consult your network administrator for the correct address.

For operation with industrial systems, we recommend that you only use a static IP address. In DHCP, the server may re-assign addresses and the PLC will not be able to locate the correct controller.

Once you have entered a static IP address, click "Save." The controller display will let you know that the new IP address is being applied. It may take up to 60 seconds to change.

To test the connection between our PLC and the controller, we return to the Control Panel and select "Modbus TCP" as the interface, and then hit "Connect."Provided that the laptop or PLC is on the same network, the Control Panel will locate and display any FUSION controllers on the network. If there are more than one, you will receive a dialog box prompting you to choose one of the controllers.

We are now connected to the controller, and can begin viewing and adjusting our settings.

Next, we will discuss reading and writing parameters. 

We'll specifically look at two kinds of parameters: setup parameters, and monitor parameters.

Setup parameters are numbered 1 - 199, and can both be read and written to. For example - digital setpoint, firing modes, current limits ... these are all setup parameters.

Parameters 200 through 389 are Monitor parameters. These are read-only; they consist of process data you may want to monitor, like load voltage, or load current, or load power.

Ok, let's look at a very typical scenario: First, say we want to write a digital setpoint, then, read a monitor parameter, like Load Current A on phase 3, and finally process the information in order to update the setpoint. And then we'll repeat the process.

Writing the setpoint is accomplished with Modbus Function 6, or "Write Single Register" which requires the following information: Slave ID 1, Parameter # 100, and as a value, 50 % or 5000.

To read monitor parameters for Load Current A, we use Modbus Function 3, "Read Holding Registers." Enter 1 for the Slave ID, 222 for the parameter, and 1 for bytes. We recommend consulting your PLC documentation for specific instructions on how to implement Modbus for your particular controller.

You can also find modbus specifications online at www.modbus.org, under "Technical Resources."

The FUSION Control Panel program also has a nice feature for finding parameters. Just hover your cursor over the value or setting you're looking for, and the corresponding parameter number will appear under the cursor.

We will briefly talk about overloading. If you are reading or writing too many parameters at a time, the controller may become overloaded. To avoid overloading, use block reads to collect data more efficiently. A block read consists of up to 16 parameters. Furthermore, do not poll the controller more than four block reads per second.

Now let's address Digital Communication Failure. Under the digital communication tab on the Control Panel we see "Common Settings." If communication is interrupted, whether because of a cabling issue or your PLC has shut down, this is where you specify how your controller will react. It's known default state that you've defined.

The Comm Heartbeat is like a watchdog for your controller. The default factory setting is 0, which stands for an infinite timeout. When it is set to zero, if there is a communication failure, the controller will continue running as it has been based on your last command. But maybe you want to know, or take a specific action when you have a communication failure.

You have two options, indicated by these two radial buttons: continue, and stop. For our demonstration, our timeout will be set for 5 seconds. This means the controller expects a read or write from the fieldbus, at least every 5 seconds, and if communication has been interrupted, it does one of two things:

If you have the controller set to continue, it continues running at your last digital command until network communication is restored. We can demonstrate this by removing the cable. After 5 seconds, the controller displays a warning and holds the last command. So to restore communication, we correct the failure and make sure the factory controller or the PLC is communicating with the controller. Then the warning alarm will disappear.

If you select "stop" and communication is interrupted, the controller goes into an inhibit state and stops operating. This is a fault state, indicated on the control panel here. You may choose this option as a safety precaution, it all depends on your specific application and preferences.

Stop mode requires you to do two things to get the controller back to run state: First, restore digital communication - fix the problem, in our case restore the cable, and make sure there is communication between the factory controller or PLC and the controller. Then cycle run/reset on P1 to clear the fault. These two steps need to happen in sequence; first restore digital communication, and second cycle run/reset.

An additional option would be to have the controller notify an external signaling device, like a light tower or alarm system. You can find this option under the "System" tab on the control panel; choose "Communication Error" here to trigger Relay 1 or Relay 2 in the event of a communication failure.

For more detailed instructions, visit our website at www.ccipower.com or contact the experts at Control Concepts Inc.

Modbus RTU RS-485 Setup

Transcript:

Welcome. This video will demonstrate setup and basic procedures for communicating with your FUSION controller using the Modbus RTU fieldbus over an RS-485 serial interface.

Modbus RTU is a fieldbus that allows digital communication between a PLC and the controller.

There are some advantages to using Modbus RTU over an analog interface:

  • Allows access to all user parameters
  • Eliminates analog error
  • Lowers your installation costs

Before we begin, you will need to install the Control Panel software, which is provided free with your controller. Connect power to the controller and connect to your computer with a USB cable. Now you will need to set up an interface between your factory controller, or PLC, and the power controller. For this tutorial, we will use an RS-485 serial port, connected to a laptop on Comm 3.

Let's look at a few basic procedures. First, we will set up the slave address and communications settings on our controller.

Open the Control Panel software. On the lefthand side of the screen, you should see "USB" selected as the interface. Click the "Connect" button.

Next choose the Digital Communication tab.  You'll see "Common Settings" – we'll come back to that later – and below that, "RS-485 Communication." For this demonstration, we'll enter "1" for our Modbus address, or Slave address, and choose Modbus standard settings: 19200 for the Baud Rate, and E_8_1 for the Byte Format. 

Now let's connect to the controller using the Modbus RTU interface. Select that option here and click "Connect." Your available comm ports will be based on your own hardware configuration; for our tutorial we're using an RS-485 port on Comm 3. We match the settings to what we set up before: Slave Address is 1, 19200, and E_8_1. 

Ok, we can see the Transmit/Receive lights are blinking, so we're getting communication.

Next we will discuss reading and writing parameters. 

We'll specifically look at two kinds of parameters: setup parameters, and monitor parameters.

Setup parameters are numbered 1 - 199, and can both be read and written to. For example - digital setpoint, firing modes, current limits ... these are all setup parameters.

Parameters 200 through 389 are Monitor parameters. These are read-only; they consist of process data you may want to monitor, like load voltage, or load current, or load power.

Ok, let's look at a very typical scenario: First, say we want to write a digital setpoint, then, read a monitor parameter, like Load Current A on phase 3, and finally process the information in order to update the setpoint. And then we'll repeat the process.

Writing the setpoint is accomplished with Modbus Function 6, or "Write Single Register" which requires the following information: Slave ID 1, Parameter # 100, and as a value, 50 % or 5000.

To read monitor parameters for Load Current A, we use Modbus Function 3, "Read Holding Registers." Enter 1 for the Slave ID, 222 for the parameter, and 1 for bytes. We recommend consulting your PLC documentation for specific instructions on how to implement Modbus for your particular controller.

You can also find modbus specifications online at www.modbus.org, under "Technical Resources."

The FUSION Control Panel program also has a nice feature for finding parameters. Just hover your cursor over the value or setting you're looking for, and the corresponding parameter number will appear under the cursor.

We will briefly talk about overloading. If you are reading or writing too many parameters at a time, the controller may become overloaded. To avoid overloading, use block reads to collect data more efficiently. A block read consists of up to 16 parameters. Furthermore, do not poll the controller more than four block reads per second.

Now let's address Digital Communication Failure. Under the digital communication tab on the Control Panel we see "Common Settings." If communication is interrupted, whether because of a cabling issue or your PLC has shut down, this is where you specify how your controller will react. It's known default state that you've defined.

The Comm Heartbeat is like a watchdog for your controller. The default factory setting is 0, which stands for an infinite timeout. When it is set to zero, if there is a communication failure, the controller will continue running as it has been based on your last command. But maybe you want to know, or take a specific action when you have a communication failure.

You have two options, indicated by these two radial buttons: continue, and stop. For our demonstration, our timeout will be set for 5 seconds. This means the controller expects a read or write from the fieldbus, at least every 5 seconds, and if communication has been interrupted, it does one of two things:

If you have the controller set to continue, it continues running at your last digital command until network communication is restored. We can demonstrate this by removing the cable. After 5 seconds, the controller displays a warning and holds the last command. So to restore communication, we correct the failure and make sure the factory controller or the PLC is communicating with the controller. Then the warning alarm will disappear.

If you select "stop" and communication is interrupted, the controller goes into an inhibit state and stops operating. This is a fault state, indicated on the control panel here. You may choose this option as a safety precaution, it all depends on your specific application and preferences.

Stop mode requires you to do two things to get the controller back to run state: First, restore digital communication - fix the problem, in our case restore the cable, and make sure there is communication between the factory controller or PLC and the controller. Then cycle run/reset on P1 to clear the fault. These two steps need to happen in sequence; first restore digital communication, and second cycle run/reset.

An additional option would be to have the controller notify an external signaling device, like a light tower or alarm system. You can find this option under the "System" tab on the control panel; choose "Communication Error" here to trigger Relay 1 or Relay 2 in the event of a communication failure.

For more detailed instructions, visit our website at www.ccipower.com or contact the experts at Control Concepts Inc.

 

 

Analog Input Scaling

A step-by-step tutorial covering analog input scaling for FUSION Controllers from Control Concepts, Inc.

 

Transcript:

Welcome. This video will demonstrate how to adjust analog input scaling through your FUSION or Compact FUSION controller.

Each controller uses two analog setpoints and both can be configured for either current or voltage. Current can be adjusted for 0 - 20 mA, and Voltage for 0 - 10 VDC. Our default factory settings have Setpoint 1 configured for 4-20 mA and Setpoint 2 configured for 0 - 5 VDC.

With SCR controllers you encounter a lot of different requirements. So our goal is to show you how to adjust analog input scaling so you can adapt it to whatever you need. 

Before we begin, you will need to install the FUSION Control Panel software, which is provided free with your controller. Connect power to your controller, and connect to your computer using a USB cable. Open the FUSION Control Panel Program.

Now let's look at three typical scenarios:

First, we will change the input from voltage to current. Select the "Connect" button on the lefthand side of your screen to access the controller. Next choose the "System" tab. You should see analog setpoints on the bottom third of your screen. First we'll change "Voltage" to "Current," as you see here. For our demonstration, we're going to use 4-20 mA as our input command signal, so enter "4" as the OFF-state signal, and "20" as the full-ON signal. We are now configured for 4-20 mA input.

Now let's switch from current to voltage settings.

For this demonstration, we will be using 0-10 VDC command signal. Select "Voltage" and use "0" and "10 as the OFF and full-ON voltage values. We'll repeat it in the second setpoint. The controller is now configured for a 0-10 V command signal.

Finally, we will correct for span and offset on analog command signals.

Nominally, our PLC should output 0-5 V for command signal, but in reality it's only running at 0.01 in OFF state, and 4.91 in full-On state. We can see the effect in the upper-left corner. With full-ON power, we are only getting 98%. So to correct for these signaling errors, we need to adjust scaling.

Let's enter 0.01 as the OFF state value, and 4.91 as the full ON value. And that's it! In just a few straightforward steps, the controller is adjusted in real-time to your new settings. 

Now that you've made changes, you might want these new settings to save a config file for future reference and use.

For more detailed instructions, visit our website at www.ccipower.com and download the FUSION Control Panel manual, or contact the experts at Control Concepts incorporated.